How to start your illustration career

The career path of an illustrator isn't very clear and that is probably why people often ask me how I got started as an illustrator and if there is any advice I can give them in regards to becoming a professional illustrator. I think having a successful illustration career comes down to the following: Unique Consistent Style, Technical Skills, Marketing, Tracking Work and Attitude. Hopefully, you will find something useful in this article.

Unique Consistent Style

I think having a unique consistent style  is probably one of the most important keys to having a successful illustration career.

Technical Skills

It's hard to execute a good idea if you don't have the technical skills to do it. Having great technical skills not only allows you to realize your ideas, but also will save you a ton of time in the long run because you will be much more efficient and responsive when clients have feedback.

You can search for tutorial videos on Youtube and Vimeo , but in order to save you  time I highly recommend Lynda.com's video tutorial. You pay a monthly subscription fee which gives you access to all the videos you can watch on all the major programs (photoshop, illustrator, aftereffect, and tons more)

Marketing your illustrations

All your marketing efforts should point back to your web site. Your web site is a place where you can centralize information and understand the success of specific marketing tactics via Google Analytics and/or Statscounter. YOUR WEBSITE IS YOUR MOST VALUABLE MARKETING TACTIC!

Attitude

After working as an art director for Microsoft's Xbox .. I can't say how important it is to have a positive attitude. Of course talent is crucial .. but talent isn't the only thing that gets you work. People are people and it's always nicer to work with someone that is positive and solution oriented. I used to hire tons of external agencies to create web sites and other online promotional material. All the agencies were extremely talented but those that could talk about their work in an exciting way, were easy to work with and accepted feedback well were the ones I hired over and over again.

I'm not saying do anything the client wants with a smile on your face. You were hired because you are an expert in your field .. articulate the decisions you made and get them excited about your ideas .. but it's also important to stay positive and flexible.

Informational

You can save yourself a lot of extra work by asking a few questions up front.

First, get the basic information:

  • Technical Specs - size, bleed, resolution, etc
  • Important Dates - (Rough Date, Final Date)

If this is the first time working with this person ask them:

  • Why did you choose me for this project? (I like your concepts, I like your painterly style, your work is cute and works well for teenage girl magazines, your style is rough and dark and works well for this editorial piece on drug abuse, etc)
  • Which pieces of work do you particularly like and why?(I like the man on the boat cause it's funny, I like all the texture in the piece you did for Converse, etc)
  • How did you discover my work?

This will give you a better idea of what the client likes about your work, why they chose you for this particular project and what they expect.

Next, get more information about the job, if it's a long editorial .. ask them:

  • What part of the story do they really want emphasize?
  • Is there anything they want to stay away from?
  • Do they have any ideas?(This doesn't necessarily mean to use the idea .. but it will give you a general idea of the path they want to take or what part they think is important/interesting)

Tracking the Work

If you want to make a career out of illustration you will need a good way to keep track of your jobs so you make the deadlines and get paid for your work?

  • When are roughs due?
  • When are final sketches due?
  • Are there any jobs you need to complete?
  • Are you too busy to take on more work in a specific month?
  • Who hasn't paid?

There are a number of ways to keep track of this information. I programmed a little MySQL database application for it .. but you can just as easily track it using a spread sheet or some other existing software. I highly recommend http://www.google.com/calendar

googlecalendar.gif
googlecalendar.gif

http://www.google.com/calendar

I have a web page for every job where the client and I can keep track of job's progress .. this page includes:

  • the job dates (roughs and final)
  • contact information
  • creative direction/job info
  • pencil sketches
  • final image
  • a link for the client to download the final high resolution file ( It is really helpful to use a service where you can store your high resolution files online.  This will make it easier for you to keep organize and share your files with the people that need them.  I use the service http://www.dropbox.com )

I created my own solution using php/mysql .. but an easier route might be to do this using a Wordpress or BLOGGER account.

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process.gif

Creating the Work

  • Brain storming - get inspired by your environment - I always do my brainstorming and rough sketches outside of my house .. sometimes I take a bus ride with no destination in mind .. sit on a park bench and watch people .. or walk through the city. When you put yourself in new environments you notice things .. you notice subtleties. this is a great way to spark your creativity and start thinking of analogies that might be good for your illustration .. if nothing else it makes your life more interesting.
  • Here is an article to help with the brainstorming process
enviroment1.jpg
enviroment1.jpg

Pencil Sketches

Next you can talk to the client and talk about your ideas .. I prefer just to create pencil sketches, because a lot of the time it's hard to envision what you are talking about .. and my sketches are extremely rough so they don't take me more than .. about ... 60 seconds ... I try to sketch very loose and fast so the focus is on the ideas and not on the craftsmanship .. at this stage of the process it's all about ideas .. and you don't want a slow drawing hand to slow them from coming out of your teeming brain.

I usually take pictures of my sketches with a digital camera .. its a lot faster than a scanner and because it's a rough quality isn't so important ..

Next I scare my client with my super rough sketches and explain to them .. to just focus on the concepts .. the final piece won't look exactly like this .. ;)

The client emails/phones their feedback .. usually something something like .. "sketch 4 is great .. but can we emphasis the blah and maybe reduce or take out blah .. make the cat a dog and make the dog a cat .. etc"

Final

My process changes a little for each project .. but this will give you a general idea of how I work.

I create my work in a variety of ways .. sometimes I paint with acrylics, draw with sharpie markers, ball point pens,a wacom tablet, paint with india ink, create textures with water color or photocopy machines, etc .. but basically what I am trying to do is create a library of modular pieces I can, later, put into the computer and rearrange the size, composition, color .. etc .. I really like organic textures and loose free flowing lines .. but as an illustrator with quick turn around times I need to be able to make quick changes and easily incorporate client feedback .. so I mix all these really organic elements in a way that is easy to modify/edit via the computer.

To spark my creativity .. I often re-use pieces from my other works .. basically collaging my own stuff .. maybe a head, or a cloud, or a bike wheel, etc .. this helps me quickly create compositions .. but it's more just for placement .. I then modify or create new pieces specific to the illustrations needs .. at the end you won't even recognize most of these pieces .. but it really helps me get started .. breaks the ice .. gets the ball rolling .. etc

* I participate in the SQUARESPACE affiliate program, but only because I think it's the best